Common Admission Test ( CAT ) ( 2006 )CALLS

Are you spending sleepless nights, getting more tense as the Common Admission Test (CAT) draws close? Do not worry, help is at hand. N. Krishnamoorthy gives you some valuable tips on how to ace this entrance test
A n MBA presents as attractive an option as a career in the IAS with the additional advantage that an MBA can choose to join either the private or public sector. As a result, the number of candidates entering the fray is increasing every year. A number of fairly reputable institutions use CAT scores for their admission processes to their various management programmes. Even candidates who are not keen on entering the Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) take the CAT in order to join non-IIM institutions.

With CAT 2006 slated for November 19, 2006 and hardly 12 days away all can , didates should be preoccupied with fine-tuning their preparations. It is to be assumed that by now candidates are fully familiar with the basics of the three sections that are tested in the entrance test. They would also have experimented with various strategies on how to tackle the different questions within each section and arrived at their own clear-cut plans for the final assault.

However, in the short period left, aspirants can direct their efforts towards reinforcing their preparedness by practising the previous years question and model test papers repeatedly However, . this exercise will become productive only if it is carried out under simulated examination conditions especially with respect to the time duration. Practising in such a disciplined manner will truly reflect where an aspirant stands.

If he/she finds he is weak in a certain area, this is the time to try and sort things out. Apart from fine-tuning an aspirant’s level of preparedness, mock tests will help build confidence levels so that the candidate can manage well under actual examination conditions.

Aceing the CAT requires no fixed or common strategy Methods differ from . individual to individual depending upon approach, perception, commitment, limitation etc. But one cardinal principle that must be adhered to is time management.

What is time management as far as CAT is concerned? And how is it to be applied in tackling the actual CAT paper?

To put it in simple terms, it means utilising the time duration of two and a half hours to the very optimum so that a candidate is assured of the returns in terms of marks. This is easier said than done. However, here are a few tips, which, if followed, would give positive dividends. ? The CAT Bulletin of 2006 has furnished some guidelines as to the minimum marks that a candidate has to score in order to become eligible to be shortlisted for the group discussion and personal interview rounds. (1) A candidate has to score a minimum of 25 per cent of the total marks in each section (after deducting nega tive marks for the wrong answers) and a total of 33.33 per cent of the to tal marks across all three sections.

This bottomline is worth keeping in mind while attempting each section. (2) To elaborate, each section, as per the normal pattern, carries 50 marks divided as 10 questions of one mark each in Section A and 20 questions of two marks each in Sec tion B. To get the minimum aggre gate, make sure that you answer at least five of the questions of one mark each and six of the questions of two marks in each section cor rectly. Keeping this as your mini mum requirement, plan and strive to answer a greater number of questions so that you have a com petitive performance level. ? It is projected that by attempting about 75 questions (out of the 90) in CAT and getting around 90 per cent of them right, you can expect an interview call from two or three IIMs. (1) Based on this practical surmise, plan to answer one question in two minutes or five questions in 10 min utes. This is the pace you have to maintain if you want to manage your time efficiently. (2) It is advisable to check your progress every 10 minutes and mon itor your pace accordingly . ? You can be smart in choosing the right questions in the right way . (1) Read the questions carefully and at tempt only those which you are sure of. If a question is a bit difficult and involves some lengthy calculations, attempt it in the second round. (2) Questions where you are not com fortable should be skipped; it is un wise to waste time on such ques tions at the cost of others which could easily yield marks. ? It is worth giving a cursory glance to the choice of answers before proceeding to work out the question. This may help you get valuable clues as to how to solve the question in an easy way by eliminating the incorrect choices. (1) A number of questions in the Quan titative Section may be solved by substituting the answer choices in stead of solving the questions in a conventional manner. (2) Employing this method, you can save time for the difficult questions. ? Under Data Interpretation (DI), attempt only those questions which are direct and where you are familiar with the data and graphs. (1) Where the questions are compli cated vis-à-vis the data/graphs pro vided, skip them.

(2) Do not brood or get obsessed with solving questions that are complex.

The time spent on them will prove to be costly. ? Reserve the Analytical/Logical Reasoning questions under DI to the end. (1) Normally it consumes more time to comprehend the situation described and the conditions stipulated in the question. You have to spend suffi cient time to think and integrate the constraints with the data provided and answer the questions correctly . ? In English Comprehension under the Verbal Ability Section, first go through and understand the questions given under the passage and then read the passage in a focussed manner instead of doing it the other way round. (1) This approach will help you locate the answers in the passage in the first reading. You may not get enough time for a second reading. (2) This is yet another tactic to con serve time.

These are a few hints on time management. However, do remember that you are competing with above average students (that includes you!) — leaving aside a small percentage of super-intellects and incompetent ones at the two extremes. So, be confident and prepare well. And if you use time management to your advantage, there is no reason why you should not come up ¦ trumps! The author is Chief Coordinator MBA, Brilliant Tutorials Put the CAT in the bag with these tips from Nikki & DJ By attempting about 75 questions (out of the 90) in CAT and getting around 90 per cent of them right, you can expect an interview call from two or three IIMs Read the questions carefully and attempt only those which you are sure of. If a question is difficult and involves some lengthy calcula tions, attempt it in the second round A date with you NOVEMBER 19, 2006: CAT (Common Admission Test) 26, 2006: IIFT (Indian Institute of Foreign Trade, Delhi) 26, 2006: IRMA (Institute of Rural Management Anand) DECEMBER 3, 2006: MAT (Management Aptitude Test by AIMA) 10, 2006: NMIMS (Narsee Monjee Institute of Management & Higher Studies, Mumbai) 10, 2006: JMET (Joint Management Entrance Test for all IITs and IISc Bangalore) 17, 2006: SNAP (Symbiosis Institute of Management Studies, Pune) 17, 2006: IBSAT (ICFAI Business Studies Admission Test, Hyderabad) JANUARY 7, 2007: XAT (XLRI Jamshedpur School of Business and Human Resource) 21, 2007: FMS (Faculty of Management Studies, Delhi) 21, 2007: TISS (Tata Institute of Social Science, Mumbai)
A n MBA presents as attrac- tive an option as a career in the IAS with the additional advantage that an MBA can choose to join either the private or public sector. As a result, the number of candidates entering the fray is increasing every year. A number of fairly reputable institutions use CAT scores for their admission processes to their various management pro- grammes. Even candidates who are not keen on entering the Indian Institutes of Management (IIMs) take the CAT in or- der to join non-IIM institutions. With CAT 2006 slated for November 19, 2006 and hardly 12 days away all can- , didates should be preoccupied with fine-tuning their preparations. It is to be assumed that by now candidates are fully familiar with the basics of the three sections that are tested in the en- trance test. They would also have ex- perimented with various strategies on how to tackle the different questions within each section and arrived at their own clear-cut plans for the final assault. However, in the short period left, as- pirants can direct their efforts towards reinforcing their preparedness by prac- tising the previous years question and model test papers repeatedly However, . this exercise will become productive only if it is carried out under simulat- ed examination conditions especially with respect to the time duration. Prac- tising in such a disciplined manner will truly reflect where an aspirant stands. If he/she finds he is weak in a cer- tain area, this is the time to try and sort things out. Apart from fine-tuning an aspirant’s level of preparedness, mock tests will help build confidence levels so that the candidate can manage well under actual examination conditions. Aceing the CAT requires no fixed or common strategy Methods differ from . individual to individual depending upon approach, perception, commit- ment, limitation etc. But one cardinal principle that must be adhered to is time management. What is time management as far as CAT is concerned? And how is it to be ap- plied in tackling the actual CAT paper? To put it in simple terms, it means utilising the time duration of two and a half hours to the very optimum so that a candidate is assured of the re- turns in terms of marks. This is easi- er said than done. However, here are a few tips, which, if followed, would give positive dividends. ? The CAT Bulletin of 2006 has fur- nished some guidelines as to the mini- mum marks that a candidate has to score in order to become eligible to be shortlisted for the group discussion and personal interview rounds. (1) A candidate has to score a minimum of 25 per cent of the total marks in each section (after deducting nega- tive marks for the wrong answers) and a total of 33.33 per cent of the to- tal marks across all three sections. This bottomline is worth keeping in mind while attempting each section. (2) To elaborate, each section, as per the normal pattern, carries 50 marks divided as 10 questions of one mark each in Section A and 20 questions of two marks each in Sec- tion B. To get the minimum aggre- gate, make sure that you answer at least five of the questions of one mark each and six of the questions of two marks in each section cor- rectly. Keeping this as your mini- mum requirement, plan and strive to answer a greater number of questions so that you have a com- petitive performance level. ? It is projected that by attempting about 75 questions (out of the 90) in CAT and getting around 90 per cent of them right, you can expect an inter- view call from two or three IIMs. (1) Based on this practical surmise, plan to answer one question in two minutes or five questions in 10 min- utes. This is the pace you have to maintain if you want to manage your time efficiently. (2) It is advisable to check your progress every 10 minutes and mon- itor your pace accordingly . ? You can be smart in choosing the right questions in the right way . (1) Read the questions carefully and at- tempt only those which you are sure of. If a question is a bit difficult and involves some lengthy calculations, attempt it in the second round. (2) Questions where you are not com- fortable should be skipped; it is un- wise to waste time on such ques- tions at the cost of others which could easily yield marks. ? It is worth giving a cursory glance to the choice of answers before proceed- ing to work out the question. This may help you get valuable clues as to how to solve the question in an easy way by eliminating the incorrect choices. (1) A number of questions in the Quan- titative Section may be solved by substituting the answer choices in- stead of solving the questions in a conventional manner. (2) Employing this method, you can save time for the difficult questions. ? Under Data Interpretation (DI), at- tempt only those questions which are direct and where you are familiar with the data and graphs. (1) Where the questions are compli- cated vis-à-vis the data/graphs pro- vided, skip them. (2) Do not brood or get obsessed with solving questions that are complex. The time spent on them will prove to be costly. ? Reserve the Analytical/Logical Rea- soning questions under DI to the end. (1) Normally it consumes more time to comprehend the situation described and the conditions stipulated in the question. You have to spend suffi- cient time to think and integrate the constraints with the data provided and answer the questions correctly . ? In English Comprehension under the Verbal Ability Section, first go through and understand the questions given under the passage and then read the passage in a focussed manner in- stead of doing it the other way round. (1) This approach will help you locate the answers in the passage in the first reading. You may not get enough time for a second reading. (2) This is yet another tactic to con- serve time. These are a few hints on time man- agement. However, do remember that you are competing with above average students (that includes you!) — leaving aside a small percentage of super-in- tellects and incompetent ones at the two extremes. So, be confident and pre- pare well. And if you use time man- agement to your advantage, there is no reason why you should not come up ¦ trumps! The author is Chief Coordinator MBA, Brilliant Tutorials Put the CAT in the bag with these tips from Nikki & DJ By attempting about 75 ques- tions (out of the 90) in CAT and getting around 90 per cent of them right, you can expect an interview call from two or three IIMs Read the ques- tions carefully and attempt only those which you are sure of. If a ques- tion is difficult and involves some lengthy calcula- tions, attempt it in the second round A date with you NOVEMBER 19, 2006: CAT (Common Admission Test) 26, 2006: IIFT (Indian Institute of Foreign Trade, Delhi) 26, 2006: IRMA (Institute of Rural Management Anand) DECEMBER 3, 2006: MAT (Management Aptitude Test by AIMA) 10, 2006: NMIMS (Narsee Monjee Institute of Management & Higher Studies, Mumbai) 10, 2006: JMET (Joint Management Entrance Test for all IITs and IISc Bangalore) 17, 2006: SNAP (Symbiosis Institute of Management Studies, Pune) 17, 2006: IBSAT (ICFAI Business Studies Admission Test, Hyderabad) JANUARY 7, 2007: XAT (XLRI Jamshedpur School of Business and Human Resource) 21, 2007: FMS (Faculty of Management Studies, Delhi) 21, 2007: TISS (Tata Institute of Social Science, Mumbai)

  • varun

    it gives more about exam but not clearly