OFFICE GRACES – Target those traps

Job-related anxieties and emotional stress often wreak havoc at the workplace,
When the going gets tough, the tough get going. Yes, we agree. But, what happens if the tough try to go, but the going gets tougher, almost impossible? Every employee, irrespective of his/her educational background, caste, creed or race, at some point or the other feels trapped in a demanding work situation. Whether the trap is set up or incidentally placed, the individual suffers considerably .

With careers becoming more demanding various anxieties may hamper an individual’s work potential. To avoid these, experts say, we need to look into their root causes: traps at work — which often wreak havoc with our emotions and consequently affect our jobs. The oddball Many a time people, fearing no better opportunity may come their way land up in jobs they are not , meant for. We also encounter several others who believe that no opportunity should be left unutilised. Sure. But, what if the opportunity does not suit you? Says Atul Arora, an unemployed professional, “I took up a job which did not suit my job profile at all, only because I was afraid that no opportunity would come my way The fear of remaining . jobless and consequently becoming the target of my friends’ mockery made me to take up this job.” A few weeks into the job and Arora realised his mistake. Maintaining momentum Even if we manage to find the perfect job, our career graph may not always be headed upwards. Believes Sudarshan Rajgopalan, an employee with Hewlett-Packward Globalsoft Ltd., “ times, employ At ees sink into a depression or a state of half-baked functioning because they do not see their career heading anywhere. Such a constant level or impasse can greatly impede the working skills of a professional.” Says Kathie Elster, a renowned Harvard trained psychotherapist, “It is important that you chart your career goal specifics with your boss. Such a plan helps both of you get the maximum out of your synergy .” Been victimised?

Unfortunately a vast majority of , employees agree with having fallen into this category of job-trap. It may have been courtesy their senior, junior or a colleague, but it affects the entire work process laterally The natural reaction is to get . frustrated or vent your spleen. But, this is not the appropriate solution. Employees should make the effort to become more responsible and steer their own course. On the other hand, managers can ensure that a culture of harmony and self-duty prevails in office. Tired of traps ‘Burn out’ or energy drain is the latest virus to affect employees as well as businesses. With demanding hours and excessive workloads taking their toll, employees are missing out on the simple joys of life. Says Rajgopalan, “Increasing employee burn-out rates are affecting companies adversely To en . sure that the phenomenon is nipped in the bud, necessary steps must be initiated.” To stop this energy ebbing, many companies have introduced tools to help refresh their employees.

With both the employee and the employer finding innovative ways to ward off traps, it is time that we recognised the initiation of such traps. After all, as granny always said, a stitch in time, saves nine! ¦
When the going gets tough, the tough get going. Yes, we agree. But, what happens if the tough try to go, but the going gets tougher, al- most impossible? Every employee, irrespective of his/her education- al background, caste, creed or race, at some point or the other feels trapped in a demanding work situation. Whether the trap is set up or incidentally placed, the indi- vidual suffers considerably . With careers becoming more de- manding various anxieties may hamper an individual’s work po- tential. To avoid these, experts say, we need to look into their root caus- es: traps at work — which often wreak havoc with our emotions and consequently affect our jobs. The oddball Many a time people, fearing no better opportunity may come their way land up in jobs they are not , meant for. We also encounter sever- al others who believe that no oppor- tunity should be left unutilised. Sure. But, what if the opportunity does not suit you? Says Atul Arora, an unemployed professional, “I took up a job which did not suit my job profile at all, only because I was afraid that no opportunity would come my way The fear of remaining . jobless and consequently becoming the target of my friends’ mockery made me to take up this job.” A few weeks into the job and Arora re- alised his mistake. Maintaining momentum Even if we manage to find the perfect job, our career graph may not always be headed upwards. Be- lieves Sudarshan Rajgopalan, an employee with Hewlett-Packward Globalsoft Ltd., “ times, employ- At ees sink into a depression or a state of half-baked functioning because they do not see their career heading anywhere. Such a constant level or impasse can greatly impede the working skills of a professional.” Says Kathie Elster, a renowned Har- vard trained psychotherapist, “It is important that you chart your ca- reer goal specifics with your boss. Such a plan helps both of you get the maximum out of your synergy .” Been victimised? Unfortunately a vast majority of , employees agree with having fall- en into this category of job-trap. It may have been courtesy their sen- ior, junior or a colleague, but it af- fects the entire work process later- ally The natural reaction is to get . frustrated or vent your spleen. But, this is not the appropriate so- lution. Employees should make the effort to become more respon- sible and steer their own course. On the other hand, managers can ensure that a culture of harmony and self-duty prevails in office. Tired of traps ‘Burn out’ or energy drain is the latest virus to affect employees as well as businesses. With demand- ing hours and excessive workloads taking their toll, employees are missing out on the simple joys of life. Says Rajgopalan, “Increasing employee burn-out rates are affect- ing companies adversely To en- . sure that the phenomenon is nipped in the bud, necessary steps must be initiated.” To stop this en- ergy ebbing, many companies have introduced tools to help re- fresh their employees. With both the employee and the employer finding innovative ways to ward off traps, it is time that we recognised the initiation of such traps. After all, as granny always said, a stitch in time,