Write it right

International employers prefer the improved chronological or combination resume
The brief one to two-page resume communicates the wrong message to many international employers who either feel you have little indepth experience or you are not interested enough in the position to take the time to detail your qualifications and experience. Many international employers expect to receive a five to eightpage resume – commonly referred to as a curriculum vitae (CV) – from serious candidates. After all, should a big job not be the object of a big resume from those who have ‘big’ experience and skills? Do not argue over this logic – just use it to your advantage.

We prefer the improved chronological or combination resume for international jobs. These resumes have the best potential to meet the expectations of international employers as well as to clearly communicate your international experience and qualifications to them. The functional resume is too vague for most serious international jobs. It often says little or noth ing about work-content skills and qualifications other than providing some highly generalised and somewhat “canned” resume statements about experiences that anyone can include on a resume regardless of his work experience.

Since many international employers prefer lengthy resumes or CVs, which list numerous positions, duties, responsibilities, names, dates, locations, professional memberships, and references, you can provide such information in the improved chronological and combination resume. However, we recommend that you write these resumes in a non-traditional manner. Rather than just provide an eight-page resume with long listings of experience, job titles, and skills, write a one to two-page improved chronological or combina tion resume that essentially synthesises the information or documentation found on the remaining pages of the resume. Consequently, your resume may be seven pages long but the first-page actually functions like an “executive summary” for a report; it synthesises for the reader all of the back-up information provided in the remaining five or six pages.

These other pages should be well organised by functional information categories that summarise and list important accomplishments relevant to your education and experience. These might include the actual titles and dates of speeches and presentations you gave or articles you published; the formal duties and responsibilities of your past jobs along with a listing of actual accomplishments and any special recognition received for your performance; a listing of honours and awards, complete with dates and a summary of their significance; information on your professional memberships; and contact information on three or four references.

In the process of doing such a resume, you are allowed to include many of the prohibitions normally associated with the brief one or two-page resume. Yes, in many cases, it is okay to list publications, speeches, memberships, references, hobbies, interests, family data, age, sex, religion and health.

Remember, international employers want to know a lot more about you than just your skills. They are interested in looking at you as an individual with many characteristics, which may or may not qualify you for both the job and the internation ¦ al living situation. Excerpts from The Complete Guide to International Jobs and Careers by Ron and Caryl Krannich, Ph.D.s. Impact Publications. Reproduced with permission from Impact Publications
The brief one to two-page resume communicates the wrong message to many in- ternational employers who either feel you have little in- depth experience or you are not interested enough in the position to take the time to detail your qualifications and experience. Many inter- national employers expect to receive a five to eight- page resume – commonly re- ferred to as a curriculum vi- tae (CV) – from serious can- didates. After all, should a big job not be the object of a big resume from those who have ‘big’ experience and skills? Do not argue over this logic – just use it to your advantage. We prefer the improved chronological or combina- tion resume for internation- al jobs. These resumes have the best potential to meet the expectations of interna- tional employers as well as to clearly communicate your international experi- ence and qualifications to them. The functional re- sume is too vague for most serious international jobs. It often says little or noth- ing about work-content skills and qualifications other than providing some highly generalised and somewhat “canned” resume statements about experi- ences that anyone can in- clude on a resume regard- less of his work experience. Since many international employers prefer lengthy re- sumes or CVs, which list nu- merous positions, duties, re- sponsibilities, names, dates, locations, professional memberships, and refer- ences, you can provide such information in the im- proved chronological and combination resume. How- ever, we recommend that you write these resumes in a non-traditional manner. Rather than just provide an eight-page resume with long listings of experience, job ti- tles, and skills, write a one to two-page improved chronological or combina- tion resume that essentially synthesises the information or documentation found on the remaining pages of the resume. Consequently, your resume may be seven pages long but the first-page actu- ally functions like an “exec- utive summary” for a re- port; it synthesises for the reader all of the back-up in- formation provided in the remaining five or six pages. These other pages should be well organised by func- tional information cate- gories that summarise and list important accomplish- ments relevant to your edu- cation and experience. These might include the actual ti- tles and dates of speeches and presentations you gave or articles you published; the formal duties and responsi- bilities of your past jobs along with a listing of actual accomplishments and any special recognition received for your performance; a list- ing of honours and awards, complete with dates and a summary of their signifi- cance; information on your professional memberships; and contact information on three or four references. In the process of doing such a resume, you are al- lowed to include many of the prohibitions normally associated with the brief one or two-page resume. Yes, in many cases, it is okay to list publications, speech- es, memberships, refer- ences, hobbies, interests, family data, age, sex, reli- gion and health. Remember, international employers want to know a lot more about you than just your skills. They are inter- ested in looking at you as an individual with many char- acteristics, which may or may not qualify you for both the job and the internation- ¦ al living situation. Excerpts from The Complete Guide to International Jobs and Careers by Ron and Caryl Krannich, Ph.D.s. Impact Publications. Reproduced with permission from Impact